Now more than ever, you are needed to donate your old blankets, towels, and sheets to your local animal shelter. With financial cut-backs, repairs on shelters are often put off, so if it's drafty, the animals suffer. I know my shelter uses rags to stuff under doors. No kidding! Empty out those closets... this is your chance to get rid of stuff and do something useful!


Monday, November 30, 2009

Shop To Help Shelters

This is very cool!  You buy your stuff for the holidays, and the vendors donate a portion of your sale (some as much as 12%!!) to animal shelters across the country.

http://www.bringpetshome.org/shop/shop.aspx

Some examples: (the top ten stores)

FetchDog - 6% contribution

Wal-Mart - 4% contribution

Macys.com - 4-5% contribution

Sephora - 5-7% contribution

Apple iTunes - 5% contribution

NORDSTROM - 5% contribution

Gaiam - 8% contribution

Office Depot - 1-6% contribution

Netflix** - $9-16 contribution
Sierra Trading Post - 1-10% contribution

COOL!


Share

xoxo

Sunday, November 29, 2009

Dog Scouts of America

In the Now-I've-Seen-Everything category:




Yes, it seems the dog wears the badges.



xoxo

Saturday, November 28, 2009

Lucky Fay

Remember Fay, the pit bull who was fought and had her lip torn off, so her dumb owners took the rest of them off?

See her post-lip transplant and eating turkey out of her new owners hand:






xoxo (A wonderful ending to a hard life)

Friday, November 27, 2009

Upcoming NYC - Area Adoption Events for November

via The Mayor's Alliance for Pets:


Social Tees Animal Rescue Foundation
Adoption Van at The Bean Coffee & Tea
Saturday, November 28, 2009
1:00–7:00 p.m.
49½ First Avenue (at East 3rd Street), Manhattan

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside The Bean Coffee & Tea.

For more information, contact Robert Shapiro at (212) 614-9653 or robert@socialtees.com or visit the Social Tees Animal Rescue web site.


Sean Casey Animal Rescue
Adoption Van at Willie's Dawgs
Saturday, November 28, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
351 5th Avenue (between 5th and 6th Streets), Park Slope, Brooklyn

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Willie's Dawgs.

For more information, contact Charles Henderson at (718) 436-5163 or charles.seancaseyanimalrescue@gmail.com or visit the Sean Casey Animal Rescue web site.



Posh Pets Rescue
Adoption Van at Barneys Co-Op
Saturday, November 28, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
2151 Broadway (at 75th Street), Manhattan

Cats, kittens, and possibly a few dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Barneys Co-Op.

For more information, contact Linda Vetrano at (917) 319-4304 or mslondonspets@aol.com or visit the Posh Pets Rescue web site.



Tavi & Friends
Adoption Van at PETCO
Saturday, November 28, 2009
11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
31 Middle Country Road, Lake Grove, Long Island

Cats, kittens, and some dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside PETCO.

For more information, contact Mary Bruce at (646) 872-1533 or Tavi2@earthlink.net or visit the Tavi & Friends web site.



Tavi & Friends
Adoption Van at PETCO
Sunday, November 29, 2009
11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
31 Middle Country Road, Lake Grove, Long Island

Cats, kittens, and some dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside PETCO.

For more information, contact Mary Bruce at (646) 872-1533 or Tavi2@earthlink.net or visit the Tavi & Friends web site.




Posh Pets Rescue
Adoption Van at Fairway Market
Sunday, November 29, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
2127 Broadway (between 74th and 75th Streets), Manhattan

Cats, kittens, and possibly a few dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Fairway Market.

For more information, contact Linda Vetrano at (917) 319-4304 or mslondonspets@aol.com or visit the Posh Pets Rescue web site.



Anjellicle Cats Rescue
Adoption Van at Columbus Circle
Sunday, November 29, 2009
1:00–6:00 p.m.
Columbus Circle
Central Park South and 58th Street (across from Whole Foods), Manhattan

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van at Columbus Circle across from Whole Foods.

For more information, contact Angelica Lema at (908) 577-4816 or info@anjelliclecats.com or visit the Anjellicle Cats Rescue web site.



Liberty Humane Society: Adoption Van
Sunday, November 29, 2009
Noon–4:00 p.m.
Central Park Parking Lot, Hoboken, NJ

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van.

For more information, visit the Liberty Humane Society web site.

Puppy-Mill Puppies Making Their Way to Long Island for Adoption

Dogs rescued from Missouri puppy mills arrive by bus in Chicago, will be flown to Long Island


CHICAGO (AP) — More than 50 dogs rescued from puppy mills in Missouri are flying to Long Island in the hope of finding loving homes.
The dogs were taken by bus Thursday to Chicago, where they were given a rest break and special Thanksgiving meals.
On Friday morning, Pet Airways was scheduled to fly the dogs from Chicago to New York's LaGuardia Airport. They will then be taken to the North Shore Animal League America in Port Washington, N.Y., where they will be put up for adoption.
Missouri launched an aggressive campaign last summer to investigate and prosecute unlicensed dog breeders.
In September, more than 100 dogs were removed from what officials called an unlicensed puppy mill in mid-Missouri where dogs were living in filthy conditions.
Go see what you can see:
http://www.nsalamerica.org/


xoxo (and Thank You, God!)

Thursday, November 26, 2009

Happy Thanksgiving

The following dogs have homes this Thanksgiving, and for that I'm pretty thankful!

Rusty (Adopted by volunteer Shauna)

June
Baxter
Joffe
Butch
Coco (Joffe's daughter)
Maybelle
Simon
Mitzi
Scout
(Joffe - another pic)
Sandee (aka Floppy Ear)
Wiggles


xoxo (Thanks to the wonderful families who adopted these fur babies!)

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Cool Fundraiser For Yonkers Animal Shelter, Dec. 3rd, Armonk, NY

If you live in the area, you might consider coming to this event...

Cool fundraiser for Yonkers Animal Shelter. I can tell you that the house is BEAUTIFUL.

http://www.newyonkersanimalshelter.org/news.html

Fundraiser for
the New Yonkers Animal Shelter
Hosted by the Domenicali's of Armonk, New York

Thursday, December 3
6:00pm

The Domenicali's of Armonk are hosting a three-course, sit-down dinner with wine, and a silent auction with pet-and non-pet-related items at their home. Requested donation is $150 per person, with all proceeds doing to the shelter. Donations are fully tax deductible.

The event is sponsored by Fiduciary Trust Company.

RSVP by November 20th to rsvp@newyonkersanimalshelter.org.

Seating is limited and only pre-paid reservations will be honored.

Can't join that evening? Consider buying a brick in honor of your pet, spouse, children or whomever.
Go here: https://www.newyonkersanimalshelter.org/tribute-brick.php


About the Yonkers Animal Shelter:
The current shelter was built 50 years ago to act as a short-term holding facility for lost dogs and cats. It is a cramped, depressing facility that was not built for the animals’ comfort or health, as adoption was not the goal.
A new, modern facility is critically needed to house the constant flow of abandoned and homeless pets that arrive, and to help showcase them for adoption to potential families. We’re more than halfway there — with over $2 million having already been raised. We need your help to reach the final goal.
xoxo

Saturday, November 21, 2009

Friday, November 20, 2009

Homeless Dogs Help Our Vets

This article kicks off my soon-to-be posted series on soldiers and dogs. There are so many organizations taking advantage, finally, of the bond that forms between dogs and soldiers, and how the dogs are helping soldiers heal from their wounds.  Here is an article that shows dog and soldier are healing each other.

via Fred W. Baker III for http://www.army.com/:

Homeless Dogs Help Healing Troops

Army Capt. Lawrence Minnis sits with his two adopted pit bulls at the Washington Humane Society’s Behavior and Learning Center, Nov. 12, 2009. Minnis met the dogs through the humane society’s Dog Tags program, in which soldiers recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center sign up to help teach animals housed at the shelter learn how to behave. DoD photo by Fred W. Baker III

WASHINGTON (American Forces Press Service) – Lawrence Minnis never met a dog he didn’t like.
“I want just about every dog I see,” the Army captain said with a laugh.

Minnis is especially fond of pit bulls, and he somewhat resembles his favorite breed -- broad-shouldered, stocky and muscular. He sat on the floor in the back of a classroom at a Washington Humane Society shelter here recently, stroking his adopted black pit bull, Ebony.

As happy and healthy as the two appear now, they met when they were both on the mend – Minnis from a near-crippling infection and Ebony from nearly starving and freezing to death. The two shared a companionship that helped them heal and ultimately altered the course of their lives.

Minnis met Ebony through the Humane Society’s Dog Tags program in which soldiers recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center sign up to help the shelter dogs learn to behave. It’s a program in which everyone benefits, officials said; the soldiers get out of the hospital and learn to care for and train the dogs, and the dogs learn better behavior, making them more adoptable.

“They’re really loving those relationships with the animals,” said Diana Foley, behavior and training counselor with the Humane Society. “It gives them a way to get away from Walter Reed. They can come here and interact with the animals.”

The program began simply enough more than a year ago. The shelter is located just across the street from the Walter Reed campus. Soldiers out walking would come across shelter staff members walking the dogs. They would stop and pet the dogs and seemed to enjoy getting to know them. Officials at the shelter had the idea to hook the two together through a training program for the troops and the dogs.

The society now offers two classes weekly that teach soldiers about dog behavior and training. Troops filter through the Georgia Avenue shelter learning the basics of dog behavior and how to read dog body language and train the dogs. The mix of hands-on and classroom training offers the troops enough expertise that they can use the skills as a launching pad for a career.

“We want the program to be educational so that if there are servicemembers in the program that want to potentially pursue this as a career, … they’re getting as much information as possible and as much hands-on time as possible with the dogs,” Foley said. “We also want it to be recreational, too, for people who … just love animals and like spending time with the dogs.”

The six-month program is split into three levels, ranging from beginner to advanced. In the beginner class, troops learn basic animal body language and obedience commands such as “sit” and “stay.” In the advanced classes, troops learn to evaluate the dogs’ temperament and how to begin working with aggression issues and separation anxiety.

The skills the dogs learn in the classes translate to better placement opportunities, Foley said. The program has far expanded the amount of training the shelter’s dogs received previously.

“This is another way our dogs are outside of their kennels being talked to and touched and interacting with people,” she said. “That’s extremely beneficial to reduce the stress levels of the animals in our kennels, and at the same time, it makes the animals far more successful in their new homes if they come into it with some basic obedience training.”

But for all of the good it is for the dogs, it is equally beneficial for the recovering troops, Foley said.

“It’s really just an outlet to be social with people and social with the animals and have time away from the hospital,” she said.

Foley described one soldier who came to the class who was having difficulty interacting with people. He didn’t make eye contact and kept to himself. Working with the dogs built his confidence and helped to bridge his shyness with the staff.

“It really helped him develop social relationships with people,” Foley said. “He went from being a very, very shy person when he first entered. [Now] he’s totally not that same shy person that he came into the program being.”

Some of the dogs are at the shelter for a few months, and many of the soldiers develop close relationships with them. Others develop friendships with the staff. Some soldiers remain on as volunteers at the shelter long after the classes end, Foley said. Minnis continues to work with the shelter.

After a viral infection in his brain stem left him temporarily unable to walk and barely able to talk, the Army officer found himself recovering at Walter Reed. He was deployed to Iraq at the start of a promising Army career when he got sick. At Walter Reed, he found out he couldn’t deploy again.

In May 2008, his occupational therapist recommended him to the Dog Tags program. Minnis said he had wanted to get a dog for a pet anyway, so he thought it would be a good opportunity to learn a few skills. The shelter had several of his favorite breed on hand, and the dogs were good companions and good for his physical therapy.

“It helped me while I was still trying to walk, being active, having to walk around with the dog. [During training], I’m not focused on me having balance issues or [not] being able to speak. I’m concentrating on what I need to do to train the dog,” Minnis said. “It takes the focus completely off of me and puts it on the dog and what we’re doing.”

But Minnis’ interests soon expanded, and often he would visit the shelter just to sit and play with the dogs. He said it was his quiet time.

“You don’t have anybody asking you what’s going on. You don’t feel a threat. It’s a just a dog to bond with and have fun with,” he said.

As it looked more like he would be medically retired, Minnis said the training took on a different perspective. He was a business major in college, and always wanted to be an entrepreneur. He figured a dog training business would be easy to start and not require a lot of money or overhead.

“I figured it’s a perfect opportunity,” he said. “I get to learn how to train [and] have a business I can work on, or at least a side business.”

Minnis eventually adopted Ebony, one of his favorite dogs. The two now regularly attend the shelter classes, helping to train others on animal behavior. Minnis also takes Ebony to the Metropolitan Police Department when he speaks to cadets going through training there, noting that he hopes to cast a more positive light on a breed that has captured a lot of negative attention.

He teaches the cadets to read a dog’s body language so they can tell when there is a real threat.

“I would take her with me … so they can get used to seeing a pit bull that’s not what they see on TV,” Minnis said. “Often, officers don’t really know if the dog is friendly, scared or ready to attack.”

In fact, Ebony is one of the friendliest dogs the cadets will meet, he said -- friendly enough that he felt comfortable bringing her home to his two small boys.

“It’s never about the breed. It’s about who owns them and how well you train them and the structure you have around them,” Minnis said. “From Day One, she was perfect around my kids. She respected them.”

In the end, though, it is not a dog-training business that Minnis decided to pursue. It is, however, what he learned from the lessons during the training and while working with the dogs that led to what he hopes is a promising career.

During the training, Minnis said, he began pondering how leadership principles in dog training are the same as with dealing with people.

“Dogs are pack creatures. Humans are pack creatures. It’s the same leadership,” he said. “It’s not about a title, or in our case in the military, your rank, that makes you a leader. It’s if you’re doing the natural things that make you a leader in your pack.”

Now Minnis is researching and writing a book on the principles of leadership and packaging a presentation targeting businesses, the military and government. He already has given a few presentations on his theories, and is refining and expanding on them.

Minnis still is a few weeks away from his medical retirement, and is working to get back to 100 percent. He has joined a gym, started jogging, and adopted another pit bull from the shelter named Nina.

Between working on his recovery and his book, Minnis said, he hopes to help the humane society expand the Dog Tags program. It is worthy, he said, of reaching beyond the Capital Beltway and out to other active duty installations.

“Anywhere you go, there are going to be dogs that need training and soldiers who are going through some type of therapy that will benefit from it,” he said. “I want to make sure that’s going to be able to expand and reach out to a lot more soldiers. It’s a great program.”



xoxo

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Lucas County Dog Wardens Resigns Effective Dec. 31st

via 92.5 KISS FM:
Amid controversy and public outrcy, the Lucas County dog warden calls it quits.
County commissioners issued a press release Thursday morning explaining that Dog Warden Tom Skeldon will retire at the end of January -- though his last day on the job will be December 31st.
Commissioner Pete Gerken recognized Skeldon for his more than 20 years of service. 
Skeldon has been under fire in recent weeks for his office's low adoption rate and high number of dogs being euthanized.

A citizen panel was put in place this year to improve those numbers.

The dog pound's manager will take over while the county searches for Skeldon's replacement.


xoxo  (Hooray!)

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Please Vote For Jenny's Hope Rescue



Jenny's Hope Rescue (link in sidebar) has rescued many dogs from Yonkers Animal Shelter; dogs that need fostering before they can be adopted. Right now there are about 25 dogs in foster care that Jenny's Hope Rescue has taken in, some of which cannot be adopted yet until they are more trusting and/or have gotten over some major medical issues caused by abuse or neglect.  One such dog was literally found in a garbage can.

All you have to do is vote to help them win a contest.  The money they win will be used to pay for medical bills of not only the dogs they have in their care now, but the dogs they never turn down and will take in soon enough.

Thanks!!

Here are a few of the dogs Jenny's Hope Rescue has rescued:
http://www.jennyshoperescue.com/apps/photos/album?albumid=3917336


xoxo

What a Riot!

via Daily Dachshund and Dog News: (I love this site)



xoxo

Sunday, November 15, 2009

Upcoming Adoption Events in the NYC Area

via Animal Alliance NYC:

Linda's Feral Cat Assistance: Adoption Van

Saturday, November 21, 2009
Noon–6:00 p.m.
186 First Avenue (between 10th and 11th Streets), Manhattan

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van.
For more information, contact Linda Bryant at (718) 205-1792 or teabag_1@earthlink.net, or visit the Linda's Feral Cat Assistance web site.


Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons: Adoption Van at PETCO
Saturday, November 21, 2009
11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
PETCO, 31 Middle Country Road, Lake Grove, NY

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Smithaven Mall. For more information, contact Michele Forrester at (631) 816-3565 or michele@arfhamptons.org, or visit the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons web site.

Empty Cages Collective: Adoption Van at NYCPet.com
Sunday, November 22, 2009
Noon–6:00 p.m.

NYCPet.com, 218 5th Avenue (between President and Union Streets), Park Slope, Brooklyn
Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van at NYCPet.com.For more information, contact Empty Cages Collective at 1-800-880-2684 or emptycagescollective@gmail.com, or visit the Empty Cages Collective web site.

P.L.U.T.O. Rescue of Richmond County: Adoption Van
Sunday, November 22, 2009
Noon–3:00 p.m.
3729 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van. For more information, contact Lisa Rooney at (718) 227-0553 or plutorescue@aol.com, or visit the P.L.U.T.O. Rescue of Richmond County web site.

Sean Casey Animal Rescue: Adoption Van at Love Thy Pet
Sunday, November 22, 2009
Noon–6:00 p.m.
Love Thy Pet, 164 Union Street
Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Love Thy Pet. For more information, contact Charles Henderson at (718) 436-5163 or charles.seancaseyanimalrescue@gmail.com, or visit the Sean Casey Animal Rescue web site.


SaveKitty Foundation: Adoption Van at Chelsea Market
Sunday, November 22, 2009
11:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Chelsea Market, 9th Avenue
(between 15th and 16th Streets), Manhattan

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Chelsea Market. For more information, contact Rosary Immordino at (718) 507-6843 or adoptions@savekitty.org, or visit the SaveKitty Foundation web site.


Social Tees Animal Rescue Foundation: Adoption Van at The Bean Coffee & Tea
Saturday, November 28, 2009
1:00–7:00 p.m.
The Bean Coffee & Tea, 49½ First Avenue
(at East 3rd Street), Manhattan

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside The Bean Coffee & Tea. For more information, contact Robert Shapiro at (212) 614-9653 or robert@socialtees.com, or visit the Social Tees Animal Rescue web site.

Sean Casey Animal Rescue: Adoption Van at Willie's Dawgs
Saturday, November 28, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
Willie's Dawgs, 351 5th Avenue
(between 5th and 6th Streets), Park Slope, Brooklyn

Cats, dogs, kittens, and puppies will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Willie's Dawgs. For more information, contact Charles Henderson at (718) 436-5163 or charles.seancaseyanimalrescue@gmail.com, or visit the Sean Casey Animal Rescue web site.


Posh Pets Rescue: Adoption Van at Petland Discounts
Saturday, November 28, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
Petland Discounts, 8517 126th Street (between Hillside and Metropolitan Avenues)
Kew Gardens, Queens

Cats, kittens, and possibly a few dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Petland Discounts. For more information, contact Linda Vetrano at (917) 319-4304 or mslondonspets@aol.com, or visit the Posh Pets Rescue web site.


Tavi & Friends: Adoption Van at PETCO
Saturday, November 28, 2009
11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
PETCO, 31 Middle Country Road, Lake Grove, NY

Cats, kittens, and some dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside PETCO. For more information, contact Mary Bruce at (646) 872-1533 or Tavi2@earthlink.net, or visit the Tavi & Friends web site.


Tavi & Friends: Adoption Van at PETCO
Sunday, November 29, 2009
11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
PETCO, 31 Middle Country Road, Lake Grove, NY

Cats, kittens, and some dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van. For more information, contact Mary Bruce at (646) 872-1533 or Tavi2@earthlink.net, or visit the Tavi & Friends web site.

Posh Pets Rescue: Adoption Van at Petland Discounts
Sunday, November 29, 2009
Noon–5:00 p.m.
Petland Discounts, 8517 126th Street
(between Hillside and Metropolitan Avenues)
Kew Gardens, Queens

Cats, kittens, and possibly a few dogs will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van outside Petland Discounts. For more information, contact Linda Vetrano at (917) 319-4304 or mslondonspets@aol.com, or visit the Posh Pets Rescue web site.


Anjellicle Cats Rescue: Adoption Van at Columbus Circle
Sunday, November 29, 2009
1:00–6:00 p.m.
Columbus Circle, Central Park South and 58th Street
(across from Whole Foods), Manhattan

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van at Columbus Circle across from Whole Foods. For more information, contact Angelica Lema at (908) 577-4816 or info@anjelliclecats.com, or visit the Anjellicle Cats Rescue web site.

Liberty Humane Society: Adoption Van
Sunday, November 29, 2009
Noon–4:00 p.m.
Central Park Parking Lot, Hoboken, NJ

Cats and kittens will be available for adoption in the North Shore Animal League America adoption van. For more information, visit the Liberty Humane Society web site.

 
 
xoxo

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Michael Vick's Former Dog, Leo, is Now a Therapy Dog, and Other Pit Bull Videos That May Surprise You

Former Vick dog, Leo, brings smiles to cancer patients while they are receiving medical treatment.



And here is a story about Dog Town, the place where many of the Vick dogs went to be rehabilitated, successfully, I might add.



And here's one more, about a woman saved by her dog -- a pit bull named Lilly!





xoxo

Abuse of Pit Bulls Continues

Here are links and video to two stories that really are a shame. It is difficult for me to convey just how maligned this breed is. I'm not saying they're all angels, but then again, neither are all people and we don't willy-nilly shoot them. Enough!



SACRAMENTO - A Sacramento family is devastated and outraged after officers with the Sacramento Sheriff's Department shot and killed their dog in a chain of unfortunate events.


Officers were called to the 4800 block of Del Norte Boulevard by Child Protective Services to investigate a disturbance. Officers admit they were sent to the house of the Plevney Family by mistake, and meant to visit a home located across the street.

When officers arrived, they were greeted by the Plevney family's pit bull, "Sonic," who was shot and killed on sight.

"I'm just angry," head of household Julie Plevney said. "This dog was part of our family. He lived in our house, he was just like my son."

The family held a vigil for Sonic Wednesday evening.

"I don't want this to happen to any other family," Plevney said.

Officials with the Sacramento Sheriff's Department admit no wrongdoing, stating the responding officer feared for his safety and took appropriate action. Authorities also say the Plevney family praised the actions of officers in a report filed with the department. The Plevney family adamantly denies such praise.

"No, they were not (praised)," Plevney retorts. "We were here screaming and crying at the top of our lungs because they were sent to the wrong address, used excessive force and killed our dog."

The family says they're considering some type of action against the responding law enforcement agency.








____________________________________________________
Man who dropped puppy off balcony is sentenced

(to probation? -- note from dellbabe68)
 By Hart Van Denburg in Animals via City Pages: Minneapolis/St. Paul News Blog
 
Quincy Lee Morrow said he dropped a 5-month-old pit pull off a second-story Maplewood balcony by mistake after the dog bit his hand.


But police said they couldn't any bite marks on the 23-year-old man, and a vet who examined the ill-fated dog said it didn't look to him like the dog had bitten anyone.

Upshot: A felony animal cruelty conviction and five months of probation.

According to WCCO, "The dog sustained multiple fractures and had to be put to sleep."

Morrow will also have to attend mental health counseling and take a parenting class.

Full story here:
http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2009/11/man_who_tossed.php
 
Idiots.

What's Up With Ohio And Dogs?

via John Horton for Cleveland.com:
Montville Township -- An archer permitted to hunt deer on Geauga Park District property killed a dog being exercised in Observatory Park on Tuesday afternoon.


The hunter -- whose name has not been released by park officials -- launched an arrow into the side of a 9-year-old black Labrador retriever named Steel, according to the dog's owner. The trained bird dog lived with Robert Phillips at a Clay Street home adjacent to the 1,200-acre park in eastern Geauga County.

Phillips, 62, said he was outside working with Steel when the hunter shot the dog at close range. He said he heard Steel "scream" from about 100 yards away. The dog had been running back and forth across the park district's property line.

The hunter told rangers that he shot Steel after the dog moved toward him in "an aggressive manner," park spokeswoman Cindy Ford said.

Phillips said that account is believable only if the hunter "has arrows that go around in circles" given the location of the dog's wound.

Observatory Park is one of six properties that the park district opened to hunters this season as part of a wildlife management plan. This is the fourth year with allowed hunting on county parkland, and the third involving deer. Last year, hunters harvested 150 deer from park properties; 36 came from the woods of Observatory Park.

The park district selects licensed hunters by lottery and requires them to pass a proficiency test and attend a safety meeting, Ford said. Hunters are required to stay at least 200 feet away from roads and neighboring properties.

Ford said that the incident took place "well within park boundaries," but Phillips described the location as "8 inches" onto park property.

The hunter phoned park rangers to report what he did, while Phillips dialed 9-1-1 and told dispatchers that "someone just shot my dog with a bow and arrow and killed it." The shooting remains under review by rangers. Deer hunting has been suspended at Observatory Park while the investigation takes place.

Other Geauga parkland open for hunting at some point during the state's bow, shotgun or muzzleloader seasons includes the Ellerin Property and Frohring Meadows in Bainbridge Township; the Rookery and Bass Lake Preserve in Munson Township; and Burton Wetlands Nature Preserve in Burton and Newbury townships.



xoxo

Dachshunds Welcome Home Soldier

via the Daily Dachshund and Dog News:



The description reads: "After nearly eight months away from home on deployment with the U.S. Navy to Kuwait, my two dachshunds were very happy to see me again. Franklin is the black and tan male and Sally is the red/brown female. Both are two years old and both were rescue dogs. For more information contact Southern States Dachshund Rescue at ssdr.org and Dachshund Rescue of North America at drna.org for more dachshunds in need of a good home. They are the best dogs ever."

Daily Dachsund got the news from Mental Floss, which is here:

http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/40324


xoxo

Fay Has a New Face and a Chance at a Normal Life

I posted about this in a News Round Up a couple of months ago. It was a sad story about a female pit bull named Fay, whose lips were ripped off during a dog fight. Fay was rescued out of that situation and some wonderful people have been looking out for her.

Here's a happy ending for Fay. Thank God for the good people who have come into her life.

via The Mutts Blog:



Go here for the full story and pictures of before and after:

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Help Ban The Gas Chamber For Shelter Dogs

Please. Go. Here.
...and sign the petition!

Care 2 Action is new to me, but if they're working on this, I'm good with them. There are over 57,000 signatures already.

Thanks.

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/takeaction/900398769?z00m=19803947

From their website:

Michigan House Bill 4263, the Humane Euthanasia of Shelter Animals Act, and House Bill 4803 both would ensure that when the state's unwanted, sick or unadoptable shelter animals have to be euthanized, the procedure will only be done by injection of sodium pentobarbital. This method is called euthanasia by injection.


The American Humane Association considers euthanasia by injection to be the only acceptable and humane means of euthanasia for animals in animal shelters.

Even though a majority of the shelters in the state use euthanasia by injection, 10 still use outdated, inhumane gas chambers. Shelter workers overwhelmingly wish to hold and comfort a frightened animal in its final moments of life. That act may be the only kindness the animal has ever known.

In contrast, even with vigilant oversight, euthanizing any animal by means of a carbon monoxide or dioxide gas chamber is both severely inhumane to medium and large animals, and demoralizing to the workers who have to euthanize. Such outdated practices also create public outcry and demean the purpose of an animal shelter.

HB 4263 is sponsored by Rep. Rick Jones and was drafted by American Humane and the State Bar of Michigan Animal Law Section. And HB 4803 would amend the bill entitled, "Dog Law of 1919." Please sign today to support these bills.



xoxo

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Lord & Taylor Fundraising Event for Yonkers Animal Shelter - UPDATED

Just two more days to buy coupons for the discount!

***

Thursday, November 12

Friends of Yonkers Animal Shelter


Invites you to

LORD & TAYLOR'S
Eastchester Benefit Bash


9:00pm - 10:00pm


750 White Plains Road

Scarsdale, NY 10583

Shop all day while supporting your community! Lord & Taylor will be hosting the Benefit Bash - an exclusive day filled with special events and savings at Lord & Taylor Eastchester. As part of the celebration, Lord & Taylor is giving our organization an opportunity to raise thousands of dollars.

Here's how it works...

Friends of Yonkers Animal Shelter is one of several non-profit groups participating in the sale of $5 admission tickets to Lord & Taylor’s Benefit Bash. We retain all the proceeds from our ticket sales. With your support, we can also be one of the organizations to receive one of (2) bonus checks Lord & Taylor is donating for the highest ticket sales (#1 - $2,000, #2 - $1,500), or for the highest attendance (#1 - $2,000, #2 -$1,500). The more tickets we sell, the more money we raise!

The Benefit Bash Offers...

  • Coupon - 20% off one sale or regular priced special item (with limited exclusions).
  • Savings Pass - 15% off Cosmetics and Fragrances, and all regular and sale priced items all day long.
  • Buy four tickets, get the fifth for FREE!
  • Opportunity to win fabulous prizes
  • A day filled with exciting events
  • Use your Lord & Taylor charge account and receive an additional 10% off your purchases. (Offer valid Thursday, November 12th. Excludes Aquatalia, Coach, Juicy Couture, Merrell and Ugg; cosmetics, fragrances and beauty accessories; Smart Value items; selected special sale events; beauty salon, restaurants, store services and gift cards.)
  • Open an LT charge account and get an additional 15% off all your days' purchases.

Lord & Taylor will donate $5 to the "at the door" tickets sales pool for every new and approved Lord & Taylor charge card.

Pre-Sale - Starting Saturday, November 7th, Shop early and pick up on Charity Day (11/12/09) or after.

Go to the Building Hope - Yonkers Animal Shelter for the downloadable form to fill in.

http://www.newyonkersanimalshelter.org/benefitbash.html



xoxo

Sunday, November 8, 2009

Help This Arkansas Shelter!

via Dog Pedia:

Dellbabe68's note: I have known for sometime that Yonkers Animal Shelter - which is so poor in resources and facility but rich in volunteers and staff that dig into their own pockets - is actually quite well off in terms of not having to euthanize dogs as often as other shelters. So, I find the following story dizzying and terrible. Please help them if you can.


FORT SMITH, Ark. -- The Sebastian County Humane Society in Fort Smith is currently home to 300 dogs and cats, many of whom won't find homes.

In October more than 400 animals were euthanized and shelter officials fear that number will continue to rise.

(Please give if you can:)

"A lot of it is taking in more animals than we can afford to care for," said Sebastian County Humane Society staff coordinator, Dan Rose.

Sebastian County Humane Society officials said donations and adoptions are the lowest they've seen in years.

"We just go further and further in the whole to buy food for the animals every month," Rose said.

To make up for some of the loss three employee positions have been cut.

Cities animal control services surrounding the Sebastian County Human Society use the shelters service to care for dogs and cats on a regular basis.

The money they pay the shelter makes up about 34 percent of the operating budget officials said.

The rest of the operating budget comes from donations and fundraisers. In an effort to find more funding shelter officials have re-negotiated the cost per animal with city officials.

" We have successfully re-negotiated contracts with all the surrounding cities but the city of Fort Smith has traditionally brought us a lot more animals than they end up paying for," Rose said.

Rose said the expense to care for a cat is about $10 a day for a dog it's $15.

"On average they end up giving us about a dollar a day for cats and a few dollars for dogs," Rose said.
Hunane society officials said a $100,000 annual grant they relied on has been discontinued, so now more than ever they need the community to consider adopting from the shelter and to donate any pet items they can.

Shelter officials said donations they are currently in need of is blankets, litter, pet food, cleaning supplies and money donations.
 
Please give if you can:
(look for their paypal button)
or send in a gift to:

The Sebastian County Humane Society

P.O. Box 10953

Ft. Smith, AR 72917

Phone: 479-783-4395
 
 
xoxo (please send them a donation; it's urgent).

Lucas County (Ohio) Dog Death Toll Rises As Controversy Swirls

via JC Reindl for The Toledo Blade:

(Note the outright euthanization of pit bulls - even puppies -  mentioned in the article.)

Warden's records show 70 breeds hit by agency extermination policy

Owners of unlicensed dogs have at least three full days to claim their pets. Licensed dogs are kept for at least 14 business days. Once those periods are up, pound officials determine adoptability.

There were candlelight vigils, calls for resignations, and reports that fewer dogs should be killed by Lucas County Dog Warden Tom Skeldon, but the warden says he's doing a fine job and that "criminal elements" are part of the opposition against him.

Animal-rights groups say Mr. Skeldon refuses to work with them and is focused on killing dogs.

Almost lost in the controversy are the thousands of dogs killed each year by Mr. Skeldon's office - 2,483 last year and 1,848 so far this year, based on a Blade review of records in the dog warden's office.

From the 145 Labrador retrievers to the single Welsh Corgi, a favorite breed of Queen Elizabeth II, dozens of unwanted dogs are chemically injected each week, frozen in room-sized freezers at the pound, and buried in area landfills.

Dog Warden Tom Skeldon talks about his office's policies

The Blade review found that so far this year, about 70 breeds were represented in the kill records - from the 131 German shepherds, 88 Chows, 38 Beagles, 31 Cocker Spaniels, and 16 Shar-peis, to the 16 Chihuahuas, 12 miniature pinschers, 11 Jack Russell terriers, 7 pugs, and 5 Lhasa Apsos.

The continued killing is at the center of recent calls for the warden to shape up or step down.

In the eyes of animal-rescue activists and members of a county dog warden oversight committee, the numbers show Mr. Skeldon is putting down too many dogs and not adopting out enough to new homes.

The county killed either 77 percent or 66 percent of all dogs that entered the pound last year, depending on how one counts the number of animals reclaimed by owners. Mr. Skeldon prefers the counting method leading to the lower number.

But something not in dispute is that Lucas County's dog adoption rate was 13 percent, much lower than in neighboring counties.

Pound Manager Bonnie Mitchell scans for a microchip ID. She started her job in 2008 after stints as Tom Skeldon’s executive assistant and office dispatcher.

As Mr. Skeldon sees it, his adoption and kill rates are "statistically glowing," and those calling for his resignation are misguided.

He said his critics must consider how his primary duties as dog warden are law enforcement and protecting people from dogs, not dogs from people. He also noted that the pound's kill rate has gradually declined through the decades after topping 10,000 a year in the 1970s, when the pound was run by the Toledo Humane Society.

The 'pit bull' issue
Mr. Skeldon insisted that his staff euthanizes only the lamest, oldest, meanest, and most incorrigible of the dogs in their care. Except for the so-called "pit bulls."


Every "pit bull" without a legal owner is killed, the warden said, no matter if it is vicious or not, no matter if it is the smallest puppy and has never bitten anyone.

They all end up the same: killed, frozen, and buried, except for perhaps eight times a year, especially when the weather is treacherous or area police agencies need to incinerate confiscated illegal drugs. Dead dogs then will be disposed of in the pound's on-site incinerator.

It seems, according to pound officials, that it takes several dog bodies thrown onto the fire to make it hot enough to properly burn the marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and paraphernalia that police need to dispose of several times a year.

"Now there are some dogs here that are not 'pit bulls,' that haven't been hit by a car, aren't sick, and haven't been surrendered by their owners … that do get euthanized," Mr. Skeldon explained. "But they're dogs who are snapping and snarling at you and won't let you take them out of the cage. They're the dogs that would be a danger for us to put out there."

Staying the course

The dog warden discussed his observations, procedures, and job record last week in an exclusive Blade interview. He addressed the claims of those who say that he is too quick to kill dogs and those who argue he is resistant to suggestions that would improve pound operations and the overall welfare of Lucas County's dogs.

Mr. Skeldon, who has been warden since 1987 and is the son of former Toledo Zoo Director Phil Skeldon, also said that he will not step down from his job and vowed to stay the course until his planned retirement, "sometime in 2011."

"They can come at me hot and heavy, but I'm not going to stop doing my job," he said. A first cousin, Tina Skeldon-Wozniak, sits on the Lucas County Board of Commissioners.


The most common breed on this year's kill list - as it is year after year - is the "pit bull," a type of dog considered inherently vicious under Ohio law and that Mr. Skeldon refuses to adopt out to individuals or rescue groups.


READ MORE AFTER THE JUMP:
...

The Blade review of his agency's records found that so far this year, 78 puppies under three months of age were among the 1,848 dogs put down.


In Contrast To Lucas County (Ohio), Wood County (Ohio) Seems To Have Figured It Out

Lucas County surpasses neighbors in kill rates for dogs


By JENNIFER FEEHAN
BLADE STAFF WRITER

Every week, Wood County Dog Warden Rodney Cook prints up 50 or so flyers featuring dogs in need of homes. Volunteers post them in area stores, restaurants, and animal shelters.

"We work with rescue groups. We adopt out to rescues. We put our dogs on the Internet," Mr. Cook said. "I would much rather see them go out the front door to a new home than euthanasia."

Wood County, like many rural area counties, has a relatively lower kill rate than does neighboring Lucas County, hovering just under 40 percent. In 2008, Wood County euthanized 283 of the 768 dogs it impounded. So far this year, 219 of the 552 impounded dogs have been euthanized.

"Out of the 219 euthanized, 134 were nonadoptable," Mr. Cook said. "They were aggressive or sick, and 17 more were surrendered by their owners for euthanasia.

"Our adoption rate for adoptable dogs is around 82.6 percent. I would like to see that be 100 percent, which we all would, but in reality that is a pretty decent number. I'd like to see it higher, but when you get aggressive dogs in, you can't send them out for someone to get bit."

Although officials in both Wood and Fulton counties say they do not adopt out dogs considered vicious under Ohio law, across the state line in Michigan, Monroe County Animal Control Officer Linda Benson said her agency - the equivalent of a county dog warden in Ohio - does adopt out breeds considered to be under the "pit bull" moniker, if they're well behaved.

"We do not judge dogs by their breed. We judge dogs by their behavior," Ms. Benson said. "A bad dog is a bad dog, and it doesn't matter what the breed is. A good dog is a good dog even if it's a 'pit bull.' … We do not put them down just because they're 'pit bulls.'•"
Last year, Monroe County took in 1,231 dogs and euthanized 443, or about 36 percent. So far this year, 938 have been taken in and 329 have been killed, although Ms. Benson said more than 260 of those were dogs surrendered by owners who paid $25 for euthanization.

That compares with Lucas County's kill rate of 77 percent if dogs reclaimed by owners are not counted. If counted, Lucas County's kill rate is 66 percent.

The Monroe County animal control office is linked to petfinder.com and does what it can to promote adoptions, Ms. Benson said.

"You cannot save them all, and the only time they're put to sleep here is when they are not adoptable," she said. "We don't just put them down."

In Fulton County, Deputy Dog Warden Brian Banister said the agency has worked closely with rescue groups, particularly Planned Pethood Inc., which sends a representative out weekly to take adoptable dogs.

Mr. Banister said the representative, with whom he has worked three or four years, "does an absolutely fantastic job."

In 2008, Fulton County euthanized 384, or about 38 percent, of the 1,007 dogs it took in. Through Sept. 26 this year, 192, or about 28 percent, of the 675 dogs it took in were killed.

Ottawa County Dog Warden JoLynn Hetrick could not be reached for comment, but statistics provided by the county commissioners' office show the warden euthanized 101, or 45 percent, of the 224 dogs taken in last year. Through July 31 of this year, 37, or 28 percent, of the 133 dogs impounded were euthanized.

Contact Jennifer Feehan at:
jfeehan@theblade.com
or 419-724-6129.


xoxo (thanks Jennifer Feehan, for covering this issue, and thanks to Wood County Animal Shelter, for not taking the easy way out.)

Check This Out in Beautiful Montana - Howlers Inn Bed and Breakfast

I have always wanted to go here. It looks cool.

http://www.howlersinn.com/


xoxo

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Andre The Miracle Dog

via Alex Tresniowski of People Pets:




That 3-year-old Andre is even alive is a miracle. That he can do one of his favorite things—chase after a tennis ball—shows what a little silicone and a lot of love can do.

A sweet-natured, jet-black Alsatian-Rottweiler mix, Andre survived a nightmare in the woods near his home in Wasilla, Alaska, last May. He went for a walk on his own and stepped into an illegal hunting trap, which snapped around his left front and back legs. Hopelessly snared and desperate, Andre did what he had to do to stay alive—he chewed through both paws to free himself. A hiker followed a trail of blood and found Andre beneath an overturned camper trailer, hiding, frightened, near death.

That’s when the Alaska Dog and Puppy Rescue squad took over. Andre, who was found wearing a collar, was never claimed by his owner, even though media coverage of the plucky pup rivaled that of fellow-Wasillan Sarah Palin, who was picked to run for Vice President around the same time. Rescue staffers kept Andre and nursed him back to health, to the point where he could hop around on his two right legs. But he could only stay upright for a few hops before having to lie down.

A dog like Andre generally has few options—he can spend the rest of his life indoors, on his side, or he can be put down. But Andre got lucky— Alaska Rescue’s Karen McNaught placed a call to Martin Kauffman. Along with his wife, Amy, Kauffman runs OrthoPets in Denver, Colo., one of the few companies that makes prosthetic limbs for animals. "She said she read about us online and she asked if we could help Andre," Kauffman tells PEOPLEPets.com. "I said, 'You bet we can.' "

Kauffman had Andre flown down to Denver and got right to work. He examined Andre’s damaged limbs, which, because they were self-amputated, had uneven bits of bone and skin. "That was the biggest challenge," says Kauffman. "We had bony edges and not a lot of skin closure, a lot of things that could set us up for potential discomfort. We wanted to be able to fit him with new legs without having to put him through more surgery."

Kauffman created two silicon, hypoallergenic, foam-lined prosthetics. "The goal was to make them comfortable and safe and allow Andre to biometrically return to normal," he says. Kauffman slipped the prosthetics onto Andre’s damaged limbs and fastened them with Velcro straps—"sort of like putting on a ski boot in reverse," he explains. "You slip it on and lock it in place. Andre could not pull his legs out of it."

Andre got right up, but immediately resumed hopping on his two good legs. But when Kauffman put him on a leash and slowly walked him, Andre began to get the hang of it. "He was stumbling a bit, he wasn’t sure where the ground was. He was like a person walking on stilts for the first time."

Bit by bit, Kauffman increased the length of time Andre spent with his new legs on. Andre got a little bit more confident with each step, but he still didn’t seem too sure of himself. Then, on just Day Two, one of Kauffman’s neighbors showed up at his Denver office with his pet lab. The neighbor threw a tennis ball on the front lawn, and his lab happily chased after it.

And then, just like that, so did Andre.

"He just took off," says Kauffman. "He ran on all four legs. He didn’t think about it, he just let nature take over. He saw the ball, and he was gone. It was a very emotional moment."

Kauffman also arranged for a friend to adopt Andre. "I had to find someone who could keep Andre with him all day long, because he hates being alone. And this guy can." Andre wears his silicon legs all day long, then sleeps without them. He’ll need to change the inner linings once a year, but the shells should last for at least five years. Kauffman, who created the prosthetics for free, says each one normally costs around $700—about one/tenth of what a prosthetic for a human costs.

Kauffman, who calls Andre "a fun-loving knucklehead," says that Andre’s story has touched a lot of people—and led to real changes. Because of Andre, legislators in Alaska passed a new law restricting and regulating hunting traps. What’s more, "Andre shows that you don’t have to put a dog down even if something horrible happens to him and he loses a limb or two limbs. There’s a lot of things that are possible now that will allow dogs like Andre to lead normal lives."

Even so, Kauffman can’t quite believe how quickly Andre adapted to his new life, given the horror of his ordeal. "I marvel at how he could overcome such tremendous emotional and physical pain and just be normal again," he says. "He is awesome."


xoxo

Friday, November 6, 2009

Rolling Dog Ranch and Jack Hanna

via Rolling Dog Ranch's daily blog: (hooray!)

Jack Hanna's Program On The Ranch (this Friday, Nov. 6th)


Jack Hanna's Into The Wild show featuring the ranch will air beginning this Friday, November 6. Depending on where you are, the program may air on Saturday or Sunday, rather than Friday, and at different times on different networks. To find out the exact schedule, please check the Into The Wild Web site here. It is not a national network program so it is not broadcast in every community. In Montana, for instance, it is airing only in Helena, Missoula, Butte and Great Falls ... at 7:30 on a Friday morning! On the schedule we're listed as Episode 306. We have no information beyond what is posted on the show's Web site.

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Vote For Yonkers Animal Shelter In This Contest! We Can Win $10,000!!!

Please go here and vote:

http://www.care2.com/animalsheltercontest/71798?refer=23758.01.1257466881.154566

It's so important. Yonkers Animal Shelter can use the money, believe me. We have a 50 year old facility, caring staff and volunteers, and dogs that live in damp, dark, and depressing conditions. Help us have a new facilty so it's attractive to the public, there is room to get to know a dog you want to adopt, and the dogs have a clean and warm place. Right now, the shelter does the best it can, but it's drafty, wet too often, and cold in the winter months.

Thanks.


xoxo

Senior Cat and Other Pet Adoption Events - Nov. 7, 14 & 15


Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center:
Paws To Give Thanks Adoption & Thanksgiving Extravaganza


Saturday, November 7, 2009



Noon–5:00 p.m.



Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center
33 Warner Road, Huntington, NY

Thanksgiving is a time of year to be grateful for all of our blessings and give thanks, and this year you can give thanks to Little Shelter and the animals in your life. This day to warm the soul is sure to have something for everyone! Meet adoptable animals from Little Shelter, Internet Miniature Pinscher Service, Grateful Greyhounds, Monte's Place Chinchilla Rescue, Project Sage Horse Rescue, several local town shelters, and more!

Please help the animals whose lives depend on these wonderful groups by bringing your donation of canned or dry dog or cat food, toys, treats, and beds. Len Marks Fine Art Photography will be available to capture stunning memories of your pets or family in holiday or fall scenes. Packages are $25 and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to Little Shelter. Enjoy treats from the bake sale and tour the shelter. Event is free.
For more information, contact Jodi at (631) 368-8770 x205 or jodi@littleshelter.com, or visit the Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center web site.

( Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center is also having a Sunday, November 29th Mercedes Raffle Drawing! -- Check out their website for more details.)

_____________________________________________________________________________



KittyKind: Seniors for Seniors Adoption Event

November 14 & 15, 2009

1:00–6:00 p.m.


PETCO
17th Street and Broadway, Union Square, Manhattan

KittyKind's Annual Seniors for Seniors adoption event pairs senior people with our senior cats. It's the perfect match — older cats thrive in a stable and tranquil home, while senior owners thrive socially, psychologically, and physically. Come meet KittyKind's senior cats, all of whom are looking to find their forever home. These wonderful animals may have retired from their hectic jobs of chasing mice and stalking feet, but their hearts have not slowed down and, more than ever, they are appreciative of a loving companion and will provide infinite amounts of loyalty, affection, and joy.

For more information, visit the KittyKind web site:
http://www.kittykind.org/


xoxo

3 Dogs Starved To Death at Memphis Animal Shelter

via the Associated Press:

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Records show at least three dogs were starved to death at the city-operated Memphis Animal Shelter. The Commercial Appeal reported details of a search warrant executed last week were made public Tuesday.

The raid by Shelby County Sheriff's officers came after a whistleblower complained animals were being mistreated.

Citing records, the newspaper reported a female mixed breed puppy that was brought to the shelter in August died within three weeks of what was described as "non-accidental starvation." A veterinarian said the dog had lost one-quarter of her body weight.

District Attorney Bill Gibbons said criminal charges are possible in the case.

City animal services administrator Ernest Alexander and 10 shelter employees were relieved of duty, but Memphis Mayor A C Wharton said Tuesday that the employees are back on the job as he awaits an internal investigation about shelter operations.

"I can't say at this point whether they did everything right or did everything wrong until I get the results, which I will have at the end of the week," said Wharton

Wharton said that volunteers are providing an "additional layer of oversight" over the employees.

Deputies seized 17 boxes of documents, four computers, six CDs or DVDs, empty dog food bags and two cell phones, according to the warrant.

Among the potential charges are aggravated cruelty to animals, official misconduct and tampering with or fabricating evidence, which could result from dogs being held for court that were allowed to die, according to the Sheriff's Office.

Photos of the emaciated dog were taken by the tipster, who repeatedly brought the dog's condition to the attention of shelter employees, said Sheriff's Office spokesman Steve Shular. A necropsy showed that the puppy hadn't eaten in at least 72 hours.

According to the warrant, volunteers at the shelter had sent numerous e-mails to the administrator, as well as Division of Public Services and Neighborhoods director Kenneth Moody, warning that animals were in poor condition.

Moody retired from the position in July.

 
(Comment from dellbabe68: I want to say that I personally have seen dogs fed twice a day by shelter staff and still be very thin. Though this story appears to have a different circumstance, as evidenced by the necropsy performed, it should be noted how much the stress of being in a shelter can have on a dog's weight. Mr. Willie, for example, is fed well and I feed him myself each time I see him (three times a week) and yet he is very thin.  Stress makes a number of dogs remain very thin in a shelter environment.)
 
Might want to pen a letter or make a call to the Memphis shelter (note: there only seems to be one municipal shelter in Memphis), letting them know they need to be more mindful, not to mention get rid of incompetent staff. I cannot help reading their website and picturing a 1950's-styled shelter, just like Yonkers Animal Shelter. I do have to wonder why they would not have acted on the volunteer's tip that some dogs were looking underweight.  I can tell you, if a dog at YAS was looking sick, limping, looked underweight, or whatever, about ten people would report it to the shelter director and it would be acted upon immediately. That's assuming the staff wouldn't notice it themselves, which happens plenty. But having many eyes looking after the dogs is good because it is hard to keep track of over 100 animals at one time.

Please be firm but considerate and of course, do not threaten any staff. Just let them know you are keeping an eyeball on them via the news. Ask how this could have happened.
 
Memphis Animal Services



3456 Tchulahoma Road


Memphis, TN 38118


Phone: (901) 362-5310


Who we are

Memphis Animal Services, or "Animal Shelter" as we are often called, has been around since the early 1950's providing animal services to the City of Memphis and Shelby County. Although primarily a municipal animal care and control department for the City of Memphis, the service center (shelter) does provide for housing and other related animal services for animals from Shelby County. Our mantra has always been protecting people from the dangers and nuisances of uncontrolled animals and keeping animals safe from mistreatment and abuse. Promoting, motivating and enforcing responsible pet ownership is our number one goal.


xoxo (though also with some saddess over this one)

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

ASPCA Grants $140,000 to Yonkers Animal Shelter



WOW!  A BIG THANK YOU to the ASPCA. I already loved them, and am a monthly donor, but this is such a welcomed development for the New Yonkers Animal Shelter.  The dogs and cats there need and deserve a new and updated shelter, and we are that much closer to the goal. Thanks to the hard work of the Fundraising Committee for the New Yonkers Animal Shelter (headed by Kay Pistone Carucci), and especially Augie Cambria - Commissioner of Parks in the City of Yonkers (which oversees the shelter), and volunteers Rosemary and Leila, who initiated the application process with the ASPCA for the committee on which they serve. Great job, everyone!  We are all thrilled! Teamwork is important.

Please visit http://aspca.org/ to see what they are working on. It is a fine organization and I am proud to be a regular supporter.

Go here to see the New Yonkers Animal Shelter website: (and take a look at our sweeties!)

http://www.newyonkersanimalshelter.org/index.html



xoxo

Dexter the Canine Communicator and Counselor

via Our Pack, Inc. - a pit bull rescue in lovely San Francisco (which has the cutest pack of dogs):


Hello, I'm Professor Dexter. I used to be a professor in bug chemistry, but now I'm a professor in canine communication. Because my person rescues dogs, I was exposed at a very early age to all sorts of personality types – in dogs that is. At well over 3 years of age, I am now a canine counselor.
I have seen many, many troubled dogs come to us that later did very well because my sister and I taught them better canine communication skills. I have found that many dog problems stem from an inability to communicate with each other the right way. Sometimes we simply misunderstand each others’ body signals (which is mostly what we go by). When this happens, everyone gets upset, really for no reason at all. Then, when the humans step in and they don't understand what's going on, it can get even worse. Sometimes humans think dogs are so much like themselves!
Dogs really are professors of sorts. They learn, then teach, learn, then teach. They teach for the purpose of survival and that survival is for all involved, not just for one. I learned from my older sister Hailey, with her gray muzzle, because she had to teach other rescue dogs lessons and learned from those lessons herself. Now I'm teaching my little sister, Posie, proper dog-to-dog skills. She's still in the "positive experience only allowed" mode because, at a year and a half, she's still young. She has to build up her skills and have a fair amount of confidence to do a job like mine and work with the tough guys. My person says that we've all taught her about us.
I like being a professor/counselor. I like helping dogs that are insecure. They're usually the really loud, barking, growling, lunging dogs that make a big dramatic display. They are also the type most often misunderstood by the humans. Humans usually think these dogs want to fight and are aggressive. But usually they're just trying to AVOID a fight. Funny, huh? I just completely ignore the noisy, dramatic show. Showing them the side of my face makes it clear that I don't care if they're loud and trying to get me to go away. I'm not afraid of them because it's all just BS anyway, and after they're done with that business, I reward them with play for stopping that behavior. This also shows them the proper way to greet, instead of using gaudy distancing type behaviors that only drive away potential friends.

Read more after the break:

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

All Good News!

So much good news tonight that I must do an extra post!

First, I've been waiting patiently to announce this. We don't like to say these things too soon because we never want to jinx ourselves, or worse, the dog.

http://pets.lohudblogs.com/2009/11/03/congratulations-maybelle/

Read the story; you'll be glad you did. I will add only that Maybelle was with us for so long that she had developed kennel callus.  That is, she stood on cement for so long that she had tough spots on her feet. Sad; occasionally they would get infected and she'd have a little trouble walking or be uncomfortable. She'd be treated immediately (and taken special care of by Darlene, shelter worker extraordinaire), but still, this one really deserved a home.

Here's the picture of Maybelle and her new family. God bless them!



Maybelle


Also, I got word that Mitzi and Coco, both adopted last week, along with Sandee (aka Floppy Ear) the week before, are all doing well. This week Scout and Baxter are being adopted.  Yahoo!

Here are the lucky babies:

Mitzi

Coco
Scout
Sandee

and Baxter (Sweet boy!)


Also, tomorrow morning we are announcing a BIG GIFT made to the
Yonkers Animal Shelter!



Stay tuned...

xoxo